SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

ELVIS: Software Engineering Research Group

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The ultimate goal of all computer science is the program. Designers, programmers and engineers must once again come to know and comprehend the composite character of a program, both as an entity and in terms of its various parts.

Welcome to Elvis, the software engineering research group in the School of Engineering and Computer Science at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Our work ranges from more technical research concerning the structure of software and tool support for development, to human-computer interaction and software development processes. We have experience and interests in a wide range of topics and applications in the OO paradigm, including programming languages, visualisation, design patterns, software reuse, frameworks, and agile methods, as well as in interface design and evaluation.

We meet within SubGroups:

Latest News

JamesCookFellowship2013

21 Jan 2014 - 07:43 in Achievement

Professor James Noble is one of two academics to be awarded a James Cook Fellowship for his research project entitled "Reliable Software Via Patterns and Ownership". His research aims to address software failures by identifying recurring design patterns in the specification of design of software systems. The Fellowship is worth $100,000 plus $10,000 in relevant exenses per annum for two years.

Marsden Success 2013

21 Jan 2014 - 07:39 in Achievement

Professor James Noble was successfully awarded a Marsden Grant for "CAPE: making capablity policies explicit", valued at $521,739 NZD.

Graduation December 2013

21 Jan 2014 - 07:25 in Achievement

Congratulations to Craig Anslow (PhD Software Engineering), Siva Dorairaj (PhD Software Engineering), Fahmi Abdulhamid (ME Software Engineering), Daniel Cope (ME Software Engineering), and Neil Ramsay (MSc Computer Science) who graduated in December 2013.

Dr Craig Anslow PhD Defence

21 Jan 2014 - 07:11 in Achievement

On Friday 22 October 2013, CraigAnslow successfully defended his PhD Thesis and is now Dr Craig Anslow. Congratulations to Craig!